Local TV Stations Face an uncertain future

Lisa Howfield, general manager of KVBC, the NBC affiliate here, watched last year as the broadcast-television business began to shrink. She started cutting. She combined departments. She made do with old equipment, and did away with luxuries like yearly sales getaways.

In December and January, she laid off 15 employees, or 6% of her staff. After the weatherman left last month, one of the morning news anchors took on both jobs. “It’s like a bad roller-coaster ride,” says Ms. Howfield. Her station’s full-day viewership is down 7.7% this TV season from the same period last year, according to Nielsen Co., and Ms. Howfield expects her ad revenue in 2009 will be down 30% from 2008.

Local television stations like Ms. Howfield’s dominated the TV business for more than half a century. They inspired the term “network”: a web of Channel 7s and 11s that delivered shows from ABC, CBS, NBC — and later, Fox — plus local news, syndicated reruns and talk shows. Because the stations owned the licenses to the airwaves that broadcast TV signals, big networks couldn’t distribute content without them. In turn, local stations became the vehicles for the greatest mass-market advertising blitz in history.

Click here to read the full article on the WSJ

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About Casey McConnell

Casey McConnell, the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, founded Qittle in September 2008. Before founding Qittle, Mr. McConnell was the Marketing Director for The Aspen Club & Spa. Raised in Greeley, Colorado, Casey attended The Colorado School of Mines on an athletic scholarship for football. After college, Casey worked for his family's construction business before beginning his first Internet endeavor--Zoe Juice. Casey moved to Aspen, Colorado where he worked in the hospitality industry before starting at The Aspen Club & Spa in 2006. He worked to develop a vitamin line for the club before he was promoted to Marketing Manager in 2007. In his work with email marketing, Casey sees the potential text messaging will bring to the global marketplace-- much like how email exploded in the early part of the century. Casey is a member of Roaring Fork Leadership as well as the Aspen Young Professionals Association. He spends his free time in the mountains hiking in the summer and hitting the slopes in the winter. In the future, Casey hopes to take Qittle global and envisions the brand Qittle to be the number one company for text messaging solutions for businesses of all kind. Qittle, whose name Casey derived from different words meaning "talk" or "chatter," became a vision of how to quantify marketing efforts while incorporating the newest promising way to relay messages- mobile text messaging.
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